THE NINTH WAVE

 

ANY CHARACTER HERE

When I first saw this painting it literally took my breath away, and that was just seeing it on my computer screen!  It was frightening and beautiful at the same time.  It was painted in 1850 by Ivan Aivazovsky, considered to be a great Russian seascape painter.  You can see why!

“The Ninth Wave”


Detail: “The Ninth Wave”

Notes:
“The Ninth Wave ‘The Ninth Wave,’ painted in 1850, is Aivazovsky’s most famous work and is an archetypal image for the artist. The painting depicts the feared ninth swell, believed by Russian seamen to be the most powerful and destructive. Copyright ©. George Mitrevski. Auburn University. e-mail:mitrege@auburn.edu

“Ivan Aivazovsky is the great Russian painter of seascapes. The sea was his life and the chief subject of his art. No-one else painted the sea the way that he did.”  http://www.rusmuseum.ru/eng/editions/video/history_rus_iso/ajvazovskij/

 

Portraits from the Met

portrait of a man DP143188

Portrait of a Man

Artist:  Abraham de Vries (Dutch, born about 1590, died 1649/50)
Title:  Portrait of a Man
Date:  1643
Medium:  Oil on wood
Dimensions:  25 1/4 x 21 in. (64.1 x 53.3 cm)
Classification:  Paintings
Credit Line:    Purchase, 1871
Accession Number:  71.63

Collection:  Metropolitan Museum of Art

I like this portrait.  The sitter looks like he has a pleasant personality, instead of the stern faces we see on many of the old portraits.  I wonder what his name was.  His collar makes him look important, like an official of the court or a church.

metmuseum.org

ALSO SEE:  Rijksmuseum Amsterdam especially the Header.

Woman wearing a collar

Portrait of a Woman

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Artist:  Rembrandt (Rembrandt van Rijn) (Dutch, 1606–1669)
Title:   Portrait of a Woman
Date: 1633
Medium: Oil on wood
Dimensions: Oval, 26 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (67.9 x 50.2 cm)
Classification: Paintings
Credit Line: Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913
Accession Number 14.40.625

Collection:  Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

I guess you would call this a “ruched” collar.  It’s also called a “ruff.”   There’s a neck in there somewhere.  I wonder what the collar was made of. It almost separates the head from the body.

This lady also has a pleasant look to her.  She has quite a high forehead.  In some paintings I’ve seen, the ladies’ foreheads are extremely high – a fashion of the day or their natural physical appearance?

Note that this is painted on an oval-shaped piece of wood.  (I love to do portraits on oval canvases, but it’s not always easy to frame them.)

And about this artist named “Rembrandt” – he’s pretty good!

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Portraits from the Metropolitan Museum of Art Collection

Portrait of Man with ruff collar

Portrait of a Man

Artist:  Rembrandt (Rembrandt van Rijn) (Dutch, 1606–1669)
Title:  Portrait of a Man
Date:  1632
Medium:  Oil on wood
Dimensions: Oval, 29 3/4 x 20 1/2 in. (75.6 x 52.1 cm)
Classification:  Paintings
Credit Line: Gift of Mrs. Lincoln Ellsworth, in memory of Lincoln Ellsworth, 1964
Accession Number:  64.126

Collection:  Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

Here’s another portrait painted on an oval shape.  The sitter’s hair and beard look like we could feel them with our hands.

Again, there’s a ruffled, thick collar – maybe that’s where the name “ruff” came from.

I wish I knew what his name was, and what he did for a living.  He seems gentle-looking, but also  strong-willed.  If he had traveled to 22 Baker Street, Sherlock Holmes would have found out for us!

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Young Woman Wearing a Collar

A Young Woman in an Interior

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Artist:  Dutch Painter, second quarter 17th century
Title:   A Young Woman in an Interior
Medium:  Oil on wood
Dimensions: 17 x 13 7/8 in. (43.2 x 35.2 cm)
Classification:  Paintings
Credit Line: Bequest of Annette B. McFadden, 1971
Accession Number:  1971.186

Collection:  Metropolitan Museum of Art

www.metmuseum.org

Here’s a young lady wearing the same kind of “ruff.”  The interior looks very dark; maybe it’s night-time.  I wonder if the box at the left is her jewelry box, where she keeps her rings, and keepsakes.  She looks sad, and quiet.

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Man with collar

Portrait of a Man, possibly an Architect or Geographer

Artist: Peter Paul Rubens (Flemish, 1577–1640)
Title: Portrait of a Man, Possibly an Architect or Geographer
Medium:  Oil on copper
Dimensions:  8 1/2 x 5 3/4 in. (21.6 x 14.6 cm)
Classification:  Paintings
Credit Line:  The Jack and Belle Linsky Collection, 1982
Accession Number:  1982.60.24

“Notes:*   This portrait is the earliest known dated work by Rubens. The sitter, aged 26, has not been identified, but has been variously described, on the basis of the objects that he holds, as a geographer, an architect, an astronomer, a goldsmith, and a watchmaker. The watch must be independently significant as a vanitas motif. The engraving of the artist’s name on the back of the copper plate is probably contemporary with the painting and is possibly Rubens’s work.”
*(“Notes” are from The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Collection:  Metropolitan Museum of Art
Note from Merillion:  It looks like this sitter is  at a window, with the outer part of his hand resting on the sill.  I believe the objects he’s holding are for the concept of the painting, not because he is in the described professions.  His fingernails are dirty; his hands appear to be rough. There’s something about this fellow’s eyes – he looks a little sly and a bit mischievous!

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Woman with Collar - Miniature

Portrait of a Woman

Artist:  Nicholas Hilliard (English, 1547–1619)
Title:   Portrait of a Woman
Date:   1597
Medium:  Vellum
Dimensions:  Oval, 1-7/8 in.  x 1-1/2 in. (47 x 39 mm)
Classification:  Miniatures
Credit Line:       Fletcher Fund, 1935
Accession Number:  35.89.2

Collection:  Metropolitan Museum of Art

Note from Merillion:  Frilly and frou-frou, but quite a collar, nonetheless!  This collar stands higher at the back of the neck, which is how I would prefer to have worn it.
As stated above, this painting is a miniature.  It amazes me that an artist can paint in an area so small!

More Portraits from the Met, + 1!

Man with Lace Collar

Juan De Pareja

Artist:  Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (Spanish, 1599–1660)
:  Juan de Pareja (born about 1610, died 1670)
:  1650
:  Oil on canvas
: 32 x 27 1/2 in. (81.3 x 69.9 cm)
:  Paintings
:  Purchase, Fletcher and Rogers Funds, and Bequest of Miss Adelaide Milton de Groot (1876–1967), by exchange, supplemented by gifts from friends of the Museum, 1971
:  1971.86

Collection: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Here’s a “flat” type of collar, with a lace edging.  Very nice-looking;  this type of collar was worn by both men and women, as was the ruff collar.

A wonderful portrait.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Reference Note:

Giles Knox. The Late Paintings of Velázquez: Theorizing Painterly Performance. Farnham, England, 2009, pp. 111, 113, fig. 4.6 (color), discusses the hierarchy of genres and Velázquez’s decision to present himself as a portrait rather than a history painter in his second visit to Rome; notes that portraits were seen as one notch above genre painting, since their subjects were so often of noble birth, but in the case of his portrait of Pareja, Velázquez “emphatically removed the nobility of the subject from the equation and thereby asserted the nobility of portraiture as portraiture,” a clear challenge to the accepted hierarchy.

metmuseum.org

Little Boy with Little Collar

Boy with a Black Spaniel

Artist:  François Hubert Drouais (French, 1727–1775)
Title:   Boy with a Black Spaniel
Medium:  Oil on canvas
Dimensions:  Oval, 25 3/8 x 21 in. (64.5 x 53.3 cm)
Classification:  Paintings
Credit Line:  The Jules Bache Collection, 1949
Accession Number:   49.7.48

Collection:  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A little boy with a little collar (and cuffs).  So beautifully painted, so charming!  I had never heard of this artist, Drouais, but I like his work.  Did this kid really stand still long enough for the artist to finish his work? Impossible!

Also note this was painted on an oval canvas.  Some subject matter just lends itself to the oval.

metmuseum.org

Portrait of Woman with Large Collar

Portrait of a Woman

ANY CHARACTER HERE

:  Rembrandt (Rembrandt van Rijn) (Dutch, 1606–1669)
: Portrait of a Woman, probably a Member of the Van Beresteyn Family
:  1632
:  Oil on canvas
:  44 x 35 in. (111.8 x 88.9 cm)
:  Paintings
:  H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929
:  29.100.4

Collection:  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I have to do some research on all these collars, to find out if the size of a collar had an important meaning.  If it did, this must have been one very important woman!

Was it difficult to eat while wearing this collar?  Maybe it was removed while eating.

She’s thoughtful in this portrait; maybe she was a teacher, or what we would call a “Principal” or a “Dean.”  Also, here again is a very high forehead.  I wonder if people in those days had a vitamin deficiency that caused balding, even in women.

metmuseum.org

My Grandfather with Collar

Rev. Jacob C. Herre

ANY CHARACTER HERE

Photographer:  Unknown
Title: Rev. Jacob C. Herre, Lutheran Minister
Medium:  Photograph
Classification:  Photographs
Credit Line:    The Herre Family Collection

We’ve seen these collars from the 16th through the 18th centuries.  Here we have a man from the 20th century, my paternal grandfather, wearing the same type of collar.

Jacob Herre was active at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Berlin, New Hampshire, and at Bethany Lutheran Church in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn, New York, where my 2 sisters and I grew up during the 1940’s and 1950’s.  I’m the oldest sister but I don’t have any memories of him – I guess I was too young.

I find it so interesting that the same type of collar was worn relatively recently, as opposed to such a long time ago.

I do wish I had known him.

Painting and the Artist

Wonderful Art

Quotation

I don’t know who to attribute this quote to; I’ve had it in my file for a while.
What I love about this quote is the passion, and the writer’s knowledge of how enriched life is when you paint, or draw.  That there are times when a single paint stroke creates magic. That it is wonderful to paint a face.  One night in class, I looked again at the portrait I was doing and realized I had given the sitter 3 nostrils.  It made me crack up!  I brought my friend over to look at it, and she said, “Who do ya think you are, Picasso?”
This is why we’re told to stand back and look at our paintings, otherwise we can get a little too involved with one nose!!
But that’s the beauty of oil – you can change and cover up whatever you want.